AllergyConsumerReview

Vacuum Cleaners – How to Remove Clog, Blockage

Is your vacuum cleaner not working or simply clogged?

The cleaning lady at our office declared that our office vacuum cleaner was not working and perhaps it was worn out and we should get a new one. Since the vacuum cleaner in question was a SEBO X4 upright and should last about 15 years, we knew that something else was wrong. All that had happened – and this could happen to you, is the vacuum cleaner was clogged. When Bob had a look at it, he found that there was very little suction power due to a clog in the machine (the clog included a pen cap, 6 paper clips, 4 twist ties, 2 plastic file markers, and dirt and fuzz). Almost no air could get by this clog, and so the clog kept getting bigger and more air restrictive.

This is the order of what you should do to find out whether your vacuum has a clog in it:

  1. Start by checking the brush head of the vacuum to see if anything is stuck at the very beginning, and, if so, remove the blockage.
  2. Next remove the straight wands and look through them for a blockage before doing the same with the flexible hose. It is easy to look through the flexible vacuum hose by letting one end dangle and looking downward toward the floor.
  3. To remove any blockage, gently push a rod similar to a broomstick though the vacuum tubing.
  4. Lastly, check out the machine itself. While all vacuums are different, most of them have a removable plate on the backside and you only need to remove the screws and take off this plate to get at the areas that might be blocked.

See all vacuum cleaners at AllergyBuyersClub.com