AllergyConsumerReview

Is Your Breathing Destroying Your Sleep?

Are you feeling groggy and irritable during the day, but wake the next morning feeling unrested and tired? You could be sleep deprived…and your breathing might be the problem.

Sleep is essential for all humans; however, restful sleep can prove to be elusive. It’s well-documented that not getting enough quality sleep can create negative effects on one’s overall health. While a night or two of fitful sleep isn’t usually enough to put anyone at serious risk, chronic sleep deprivation can create major problems like increasing risk of stroke, increasing the risk of diabetes, memory loss, becoming more accident prone, premature aging and higher chances of obesity.

Those who’ve experienced allergies, asthma or any other breathing difficulties can tell you, struggling to breathe can also have a major impact on the amount and quality of sleep you get. This is especially true for children, whose bodies and brains are still developing, and who can be particularly affected by lack of sleep. In addition, anyone with chronic breathing issues like sleep apnea or COPD can also be more susceptible to sleep deprivation.

According to the American Psychological Association:

It stands to reason that improving one’s ability to breathe can have positive, far-reaching health benefits, one of which is achieving a better night’s sleep. So what are some ways to start breathing (and sleeping!) better?

Removing as many allergy and asthma triggers from the home – and the bedroom in particular – can help. Drapery, excess bedding, carpets and rugs, stuffed animals and pets can all complicate breathing for asthmatics.

Vacuuming regularly with a machine that is equipped with a HEPA filter can help remove allergens from the air. Investing in a high-quality air purifier can also go a long way toward greatly reducing contaminants, dander, dust and particulate from your indoor environment. Eliminating sources of odor – be it organic (mold, mildew) or synthetic (air fresheners, potpourri) – may also help. Improving the indoor air quality of your home can significantly improve breathing.

If weight loss and significant improvements of your indoor air quality still aren’t helping you breathe better at night, visit with your physician. He or she might refer you to a sleep clinic, which will monitor and observe your sleeping patterns to see if you have an underlying sleep disorder. Or your physician might prescribe medication, such as a steroid inhaler, to facilitate better breathing.

 

 

 

 

Sources:
[1] http://www.apa.org/topics/sleep/why.aspx
[2] http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/weight-loss-breathing-devices-still-best-for-treating-obstructive-sleep-apnea-201310026713
[3] http://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/asthma-and-sleep